Monday, October 22, 2007

Grapes Prevent Prostate Cancer Growth

Another proof that food is your best medicine: an extract of the skin of muscadine grapes prevents prostate cancer growth.
The muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia) is distinct from the more common red grapes used to produce red wines, a major source of resveratrol. The chemical constituents of muscadine grapes differ from most other grape varieties, as they are richer in chemicals called anthocyanins. Anthocyanins, which produce the red and purple colors of the grapes, have strong antioxidant activity and have shown several antitumor effects, including inhibition of DNA synthesis in breast cancer cells, of blood vessel growth in some tumors, and of enzymes involved in tumor spread. Muscadine grapes can be found growing wild from Delaware to the Gulf of Mexico and westward from Missouri to Texas.


Even though MSKE had significant inhibitory effects on the prostate cancer cells studied, it did not alter the growth rate of the normal human prostate cells in the lab, which served as controls. Ongoing studies of MSKE in animals will help to determine the underlying mechanisms of MSKE's inhibitory effects in prostate cancer cells. The researchers hope that the lab effects of MSKE will be reproducible in testing on cancerous and normal prostate cells in animals. Should MSKE move on to trials in humans, Green says that since “muscadine grape products, including grape juice and grape wine, have been used in human studies without reported side effects, they may be relatively safe for use in clinical trials.” Read more

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